My Opinion

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Abducted, Abused, Discriminated

MuslimThat the Islam is getting only used from the uneducated ones for empowering themselves gets shown in the case from the Nigerian girl Aisha Moussa, who got kidnapped and converted under pressure to the Islam religion. That a conversion under force has no real value shows already the missing education of the Muslims and their barbarian style of living. Only idiots are thinking that the end justifies the means.

For ten months the Nigerian Aisha Moussa thought her life would end at any moment. The 15-year-old was abducted in February of last year of Boko Haram Islamic terrorist militia. One night the extremists invaded her village Gulak in the Federal State of Adamawa and kidnapped Aisha and other young Christians and brought them to a camp in Sambisa forest.

Aisha recalls: "I was buried up to the waist. So they wanted to force me to convert to Islam". After three weeks of torture, she gave up her resistance. She denied her Christian faith and was forcibly married to one of the fundamentalists - a man she estimates at the beginning of 30.

Many other girls and young women in the camp suffered a similar fate, says Aisha. "Some were just eight years old," she says. During the day they were forced to work in the camp. "But what we feared most was when our husbands returned in the evenings, because that meant abuse and rape," says Aisha. Tears run down her cheeks, when she recalls countless coercion in revolver holding in.

The terrorist group, which wants to establish a so-called "god-state" with a strict interpretation of Islamic law in the north-east of Nigeria and the neighboring areas and the neighboring countries of Cameroon, Niger and Chad, has been dragging away women and women for years. Similar to the crude ideology of the terrorist organization Islamic State (Daesh) in Iraq and Syria, Boko Haram calls the enslavement of women of different faith as a religious duty.

According to Amnesty International, at least 2,000 women and girls have been confined to the Islamists' captivity. They are forced to marry, kept as sex slaves, have to transport weapons or getting forced to suicide bombings.

The United Nations Humanitarian Affairs Coordinator in Nigeria, Fatma Samoura, believes that even up to 7,000 girls and women are in captivity of the terrorists. The world's most famous case is that of the more than 200 girls who were dragged from the dormitory of their school in the city of Chibok in northeastern Nigeria.

Aisha can can consider herself lucky. She is one of the few women who have managed to escape from the hands of the terrorists. After months of imprisonment, she slipped out of the camp one night and ran ten days through the forest until she reached the border to Cameroon. In the border town of Mora, Aisha was taken up by soldiers and taken to a refugee camp in Minawao.

There she has lived since the beginning of the year - but the other refugees still look at the girl with suspicions. "Boko Haram"women might be spies or suspected suicide bombers. "I'm treated as if I had a contagious disease," says Aisha. "When I come, the others turn away."

"We just can not trust these girls," says a security officer from the refugee camp who wants to remain anonymous. The mistrust is great, because Boko Haram forces more and more children to blow themselves up as an assassin. More than 40 minors committed suicide attacks in Nigeria, Cameroon and Chad last year, according to the UN Children's Fund agency UNICEF. Three quarters from them were girls. In attacks and attacks by the group, at least 14,000 people have died since 2009.

According to UNICEF, the calculated use of minors has created an atmosphere of fear and suspicion. Especially girls who can escape the captivity of Boko Haram would be considered potential security risks and therefore excluded and discriminated. "One thing must be clear: these children are victims, not offenders," said the UNICEF Director for West and Central Africa, Manuel Fontaine. The children were systematically deceived and instrumentalised, according to Fontaine.

Despite the harsh treatment, Aisha is glad she is here. She feels safe in the refugee camp for the first time for years. Even in Gulak, before her abduction, she lived with her family in constant fear of terrorist attacks. What costs Aisha the sleep is the concern for her family in Nigeria. She fears that her parents and siblings might have been killed on the night of their kidnapping by the fighters. This concern was worse than anything that had happened to you in the past few months, Aisha said. "These thoughts kill me inwardly," she said.